Majestic Waterfront Mansion...

Live the ultimate concierge lifestyle with resort-style amenities
  • Newly renovated 90,000 sq. ft. clubhouse with men's and ladies card rooms; a business center; five lounge and bar areas, including a Sports Bar with billiard tables and four dining venues, open all year.
  • private beach club directly on Juno Beach with full gourmet restaurant and resort style cabana service.
  • New state-of the-art 24,000 sq. ft. fitness center and spa, new heated resort pool and separate lap pool, as well as a full service salon and spa.
  • Two championship 18 hole golf courses; driving range; golf practice and training area; international caddie program.
  • 16 Lighted Har-Tru tennis courts.
  • 24/7 Security and Paramedic staff and state of the art surveillance technology; neighborhood K-9, waterway, perimeter, and golf course patrols.
  • Dog park: outdoor club for four legged members and stocked lakes for fishing.
  • Children's activity center, playground, basketball court and special club programs, including carnival, ice skating, amusement rides and games.

Beach and Country Club Lifestyle

5-Star Resort Concierge Living
  • all day complimentary valet service;
  • complimentary breakfast;
  • dinner hors d'oeuvres, bottled water, coffee, tea, healthy snacks and cookies;
  • club  sommelier;
  • planned entertainment;
  • travel;
  • community philanthropic organization;
  • educational seminars and art exhibitions;
  • airport and local transportation;
  • food delivery;
  • home repair and house watch services;
  • business center and conference rooms;
  • dry cleaning pick up and delivery;
  • hurricane preparation, shelter and post cleanup services.

The founder of a Florida-based mortgage servicing firm was sentenced to five years in prison yesterday for her participation in a six-year scheme to prepare and file more than 1 million fraudulently-signed and notarized documents.

Lorraine Brown, 56, launched the company DocX, which later became Jacksonville-based LPS Document Solutions.

In addition to her prison term, Brown was sentenced to serve two years of supervised release and ordered to pay a fine of $15,000.

In November, Brown pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud. She was accused of hiring cheap, temporary workers who were trained to mimic other people’s signatures so that mortgage paperwork could be processed faster, according to the complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Jacksonville.

More documents meant more money for the firm, which generated about $60 million in gross revenue between 2003 and 2009 as the real estate bubble burst and banks pushed to repossess homes.

“Lorraine Brown will spend five years in prison for her central role in a scheme to fraudulently execute thousands of mortgage-related documents while our nation’s housing market was at its most vulnerable point in generations,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Mythili Raman. “The documents that were fraudulently produced under Brown’s direction were relied upon in court proceedings, including a significant number of foreclosure and bankruptcy matters.”

While banks did issue special corporate resolutions delegating signing authority to specific, specially trained DocX employees, the complaint said other employees were also signing the names of the authorized signers.

“To assist in the scheme, samples of the actual authorized signers’ signatures were taped to the signing tables,” the complaint said.

The practice was called “surrogate signing,” according to the complaint.

In January, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi announced a settlement was reached with Lender Processing Services and its subsidiaries for more than $120 million. The settlement included 45 other attorneys general, and was negotiated after an investigation led by Bondi’s office.

Florida’s share of settlement is approximately $8.6 million.

Former assistant state attorneys general June Clarkson and Theresa Edwards first brought the LPS issues to light in 2010 but were later fired while investigating Florida large foreclosure law firms.

LPS officials had complained to the state about Clarkson and Edwards and their use of the word “forgery” in a 2010 presentation that included DocX and LPS documents.

The Florida inspector general cleared Attorney General Pam Bondi’s office of wrongdoing in the firings.

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This entry was posted
on Wednesday, June 26th, 2013 at 8:32 am and is filed under Florida economy, Foreclosures, Housing affordability, Housing boom.
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