Majestic Waterfront Mansion...

Live the ultimate concierge lifestyle with resort-style amenities
  • Newly renovated 90,000 sq. ft. clubhouse with men's and ladies card rooms; a business center; five lounge and bar areas, including a Sports Bar with billiard tables and four dining venues, open all year.
  • private beach club directly on Juno Beach with full gourmet restaurant and resort style cabana service.
  • New state-of the-art 24,000 sq. ft. fitness center and spa, new heated resort pool and separate lap pool, as well as a full service salon and spa.
  • Two championship 18 hole golf courses; driving range; golf practice and training area; international caddie program.
  • 16 Lighted Har-Tru tennis courts.
  • 24/7 Security and Paramedic staff and state of the art surveillance technology; neighborhood K-9, waterway, perimeter, and golf course patrols.
  • Dog park: outdoor club for four legged members and stocked lakes for fishing.
  • Children's activity center, playground, basketball court and special club programs, including carnival, ice skating, amusement rides and games.

Beach and Country Club Lifestyle

5-Star Resort Concierge Living
  • all day complimentary valet service;
  • complimentary breakfast;
  • dinner hors d'oeuvres, bottled water, coffee, tea, healthy snacks and cookies;
  • club  sommelier;
  • planned entertainment;
  • travel;
  • community philanthropic organization;
  • educational seminars and art exhibitions;
  • airport and local transportation;
  • food delivery;
  • home repair and house watch services;
  • business center and conference rooms;
  • dry cleaning pick up and delivery;
  • hurricane preparation, shelter and post cleanup services.

Florida homeowners say they paid thousands of dollars to a Plantation-based land trust and signed away their deeds in a complicated scheme that led to an attorney general’s lawsuit last week.

In a handful of complaints released by the attorney general’s office, borrowers statewide say they were contacted by solicitors for Whitestone Capital Trust promising to cancel their current mortgage and offer a new lower mortgage that reflects their home’s current value.

One Jacksonville man says he paid a total of $5,113 to sign up for the plan, which included him signing over his deed, paying “closing costs” of $4,000, a new monthly payment of $944 to Whitestone Capital, and $169 to solicitor Carefree Properties to review his loan for eligibility.

Homeowner Burgess Porter was told he would save $213,800 with his new mortgage.

“Shortly thereafter, Mr. Porter started receiving calls from his mortgage company about his missing monthly payments,” wrote Jacksonville legal aid attorney Allison Albert in May to the attorney general.

Plantation homeowner Leslie Williams said she paid $12,000 to Whitestone Capital Trust for a new mortgage on three of her properties.

“They said that they would get the lender note and mortgage eliminated,” she wrote, also in May. “I believe they are affiliated in some way with Fidelity Land Trust.”

In September, the attorney general shut down Fidelity Land Trust, which had an office in Boca Raton. Although a lawsuit filed in Broward County Court froze the trust’s operations, last week’s lawsuit against Whitestone says that Fidelity and Whitestone continued to operate the land trust business after the September suit.

In another Aug. 8 complaint about Whitestone, a Fort Lauderdale homeowner says he paid $8,000 to the company to “set up a trust,” that was also supposed to help him with his mortgage.

When Porter, the Jacksonville homeowner, got suspicious following the calls from his mortgage company, he drove to Whitestone’s office, which was in Coral Springs at the time. Porter was told Whitestone had too many clients and that his file had gotten lost in the shuffle.

He was also told that the name of the land trust had changed to Private Capital Trust, and the deed to his home would have to be conveyed to the new trust.

Soon after, Porter asked for his money back. It’s unclear in the letter if he got a refund. According to emails from Carefree Properties to Porter, the company sent a notary to his house to sign over his deed, but Duval County property records show the home is still in Porter’s name.

Porter’s initial contact was with Carefree Properties, whose license number is tied to Realtor Matthew Krac. Krac, whose license is still listed as valid on the Department of Business and Professional Regulation website, was added to the attorney general’s lawsuit against Fidelity Land Trust in February.

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This entry was posted
on Friday, August 16th, 2013 at 9:16 am and is filed under Florida economy, Foreclosures, Mortgage fraud.
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